Spring Is Around the Corner: Is it Time to Switch Your Winter Tires?

Winter tires are important for keeping you safe on the road during the hazardous conditions of snowy and icy roads. But as the snow starts to melt and the days get warmer, you might start thinking about switching back to all-season or summer tires. Before you make the switch, here are the top five factors that can influence your timing.

Winter Tire Laws in Your Province

When is it legal for you to go back to summer or all-season tires? In New Brunswick there is no law stating you cannot leave your winter tires on all year long. However, if your tires are studded you are required to change them no later than April 30th. Know the law – avoid a ticket.

Check That Weather Report

It’s safe to remove your winter tires once the average daily high is above 7 C and the risk of snow or frost has passed. Keep an eye on the averages in your area and take a look at the long range forecast before switching out. Late spring snowfall isn’t unusual in New Brunswick, so be prepared; Environment Canada can give you the information you need. Remember that black ice isn’t visible, so the temperature is an important factor in ensuring you are safe on the road.

Where Will You Store Your Winter Tires?

Before you take them off, you should know where you’re going to put them. Improper storage of your winter tires can lead to damage that will shorten their lifespan. At CrownAuto Pro we can store your tires all year around. If you plan to store them at home, be sure to follow these important tips:

  • Purchase proper storage bags and store each tire in its own individual bag
  • Do not hang the tires, instead stack them carefully
  • Do not stack more than four tires high
  • Store in a cool, dry place

How’s That Gas Mileage?

One of the main downfalls of winter tires used past the end of dangerous conditions is that they aren’t designed for dry pavement. That means a lot of road noise as well as something that could cost you – decreased gas mileage. Once you are clear of the danger of ice and snow and the temperatures have risen, changing over to summer or all-season tires can save you on the cost of gas, so don’t put it off any longer than is necessary.

Winter Tires are Expensive – Make Them Last

When you invest in winter tires you expect to get several seasons of use out of them. But using them longer than you should, especially on dry pavement, can cause them to wear out faster, meaning you will be replacing them sooner. Of course, you should take all of the important factors into consideration and not remove them too early just to avoid wear; safety is the number one concern.

While you don’t ever want to take your winter tires off before it’s time, it can be damaging to leave them on too long. The right combination of weather conditions is far more important than the date – just make sure you’re within the legal requirements.

What is Rustcheck?

WHAT IS RUSTCHECK??

Rust Check is a premier automobile body panel protectant that has been used successfully since 1973. It is a light liquid product that is applied inside body sections as a pressurized spray.

Crevice areas hidden inside body sections, such as joints, folds, seams, and spot welds therein are the places where corrosion starts and spreads from. Rust Check has the light liquid consistency and the active additives necessary to penetrate deeply into and protect the many vulnerable crevices found in today’s vehicles.

Rust Check protects metals by displacing moisture and treating the surfaces with highly effective corrosion inhibitors. The corrosion inhibitors form an adsorbed (bonded) layer on the metal surfaces. This microscopic layer acts like a series of tiny umbrellas, shielding the surfaces from water molecules. Just as a car battery will not work without its electrolyte, metal corrosion will not occur if moisture does not contact the metal.

WHAT DOES RUSTCHECK DO?

  • Firstly, RUST CHECK penetrates welded seams, crevices and provides excellent protection for these corrosion-prone areas. Sealants are not as effective in protecting these vital areas.
  • RUST CHECK does not require shiny clean metal surfaces for good adhesion and is effective on both used and new vehicles. While Rust Check will not reverse existing corrosion damage, it will drastically reduce its progression.
  • RUST CHECK is a unique electro-chemical compound that contains Self-Healing Properties.
  • RUST CHECK dispels moisture trapped in seams and crevices; “Sealants” usually trap moisture in these corrosion-prone areas.
  • RUST CHECK “Unlike Sealants” is non-drying; it remains mobile and will never dry, crack or peel.
  • RUST CHECK lubricates as it protects against corrosion.
  • RUST CHECK “Unlike Sealants” does not contain any offensive odours or potentially toxic petroleum solvents.
  • RUST CHECK will not damage painted surfaces and any over spray can be easily cleaned off.
  • RUST CHECK is completely reapplied each and every year to maintain a high on-going level of protection. “Sealants” usually are just inspected or touched-up.
  • RUST CHECK offers annually renewable warranties with unlimited mileage and transferable ownership for new and qualified used vehicles.

Rust Check utilizes a unique two-step application process designed specifically to provide highly effective corrosion protection by utilizing products appropriate to different parts of your vehicle. The protection your vehicle requires varies as a result of its design. One product cannot be effective in all areas. Accordingly, the Rust Check Two Product Process uses:

 

HOW IS RUSTCHECK APPLIED?

STEP 1

RUSTCHECK (Rustcheck inside body panels and other hidden areas)

Your vehicle’s construction requires numerous joints, bends, folds, and seams and thousands of associated weld spots. Consequently, areas inside of the body sections contain a multitude of crevices into which corrosive moisture and road salts concentrate.

The resulting corrosion not only affects the appearance of your vehicle but also attacks the joints and spot welds that hold your vehicle together. The result is a vehicle that can become unsafe.

Rustcheck is a light oil based liquid, formulated to penetrate into and protect the many vulnerable crevices hidden inside your vehicle.

STEP 2

RUSTCHECK COAT & PROTECT

(Rustcheck Coat & Protect for exposed undercarriage areas)

Rustcheck Coat & Protect provides the required protection for exposed areas of your vehicles undercarriage.

Coat & Protect is formulated as a premium undercarriage treatment that forms adherent and wash resistant, but non-drying and self-healing protective films that will not crack or peel.

Coat & Protect also provides excellent undercarriage appearance and lubricates as it protects.

 

 

 

WHY DOES RUST CHECK BEAT ALL OTHER PRODUCTS ON THE MARKET?

 

Unlike conventional oil, tar and wax-based products, which do little more than just cover up the metal in your vehicle, Rust Check creeps into all hidden rust prone areas including doors, fenders, pillars, frame members, engine compartments and cavernous undercarriage areas where the Rusties love to hide out.

  • Rust Check is time tested and proven for over 40 years.
  • Rust Check is not only for new vehicles. Even older vehicles and those treated with other inadequate rust coatings can benefit from the deep penetrating action of Rust Check.
  • Rust Check will not repair damage already done to older vehicles but it will inhibit the progression of rust in problem areas.
  • Rust Check has been accredited by Millions of satisfied customers this is the most compelling evidence that Rust Check really works.
  • Rust Check preserves wiring connections, electronic components and creates a less hostile environment for mechanics, which will save you money and protect your investment.

So call us today to schedule your appointment.

Your vehicle will thank you during the winter months!

SPRING MAINTENANCE TIP: Get your car’s A/C checked!

 

If you haven’t used your vehicle’s air conditioning system all winter, now is the time to get it checked out before you actually need it in summer. Don’t wait till the 80-degree weather rolls in, because when it does and you have no AC, it’s going to be a long, sweaty and miserable commute. Taking care of AC maintenance in spring will allow you to avoid frustration

How to Test for AC Problems

The test is simple: just press the AC button and observe what happens. Note any unusual smells or noises, as they could be warning signs. Change the cool air dial to try different settings. Make sure that your AC system responds adequately when you increase or reduce cool air flow. Just like not having enough cool air is an issue, having cool air blast in your face with no option to turn it down is also uncomfortable.

Signs of AC Problems

  • No cool air at all
  • Cool air is delivered sporadically
  • Air is cool, but not cool enough
  • Loud noises when you turn on AC

What Causes Car AC Problems

The most common causes of AC problems in your vehicle are leaks. This includes other substances, such as water and air, getting inside AC system components due to damaged seals. This also includes situations when the refrigerant (whether it’s Freon or R134A) is leaking out of the system. Aside from leaks, AC system components, such as the compressor or condenser may be failing or malfunctioning. The exact issue can only be pinpointed after a detailed inspection.

If your vehicle was built somewhere before 1995, it’s possible the refrigerant used in your AC system is Freon (R-12). Freon was found to have a negative effect on our ozone layer and was eventually phased out. It’s no longer manufactured, so obtaining it may be difficult and expensive. A better solution is to convert your vehicle to use the R134A refrigerant.

If you find that your vehicle’s AC system is not performing as desired, contact us at Crown AutoPro. We’ll be able to take a closer look, find leaks, perform refrigerant recharge or replace failing components, depending on what’s causing the issue.

Importance of checking Tire Pressures in the Winter

tire pressureBe sure to check your tire pressure at least twice over the winter! Why? Because the cold weather will lower your tire pressure. In fact, the pressure will drop by about 1 psi for every five degrees Celsius. Checking your pressure at least once a month or before heading out on a long trip will help you stay safe on the road, save on gas, and make your tires last longer.

It’s Time for a 21st Century Tune-up

Times are changing…cars are changing. One of the biggest changes in today’s automotive industry is the perception of a “tune-up.” Ask 10 vehicle owners their definition of a tune-up and chances are there’ll be 10 different answers. The classic “tune-up” was once the heart of the automotive business and contrary to some beliefs; today’s modern vehicles still need tune-ups to keep them performing at the most efficient levels.

Flash Automotive Repair Inc.The tune-up was historically associated with the routine replacement of key ignition system parts like spark plugs and ignition points, along with some basic adjustments to help “tune” the engine. Mounting pressure for increased fuel economy and lower emissions drove the car manufacturers to adopt electronics and to do away with ignition points in the ’70s, along with the carburetor in the middle ’80s. This eliminated the need for the replacement and adjustment of a growing number of ignition and fuel system parts.

As the pace of technology quickened, the procedures required to perform a traditional tune-up changed dramatically. Highly sophisticated ignition and fuel systems are now the norm, using one or more onboard computers to control critical engine and transmission management functions. Things that were once handled mechanically are now controlled electronically through the widespread use of onboard computer technology.

Because vehicles have changed so much over the years, the Car Care Council has introduced the 21st Century Tune-up. This program is designed to help re-define and educate motorists as to what a tune-up should consist of on today’s modern vehicles.

“There is a misconception that today’s modern vehicles don’t need tune-ups because they never break down, but that simply is not true,” said Rich White, executive director of the Car Care Council. “If you’re at work and your computer goes down, you can’t get any more work done. It’s the same with your vehicle. If the vehicle isn’t being properly maintained, you’re not going to get where you want to go.”

As part of the 21st Century Tune-up on today’s modern vehicles, the following systems should be inspected:

  • battery, charging and starting
  • engine mechanical
  • powertrain control (including onboard diagnostic checks)
  • fuel
  • ignition
  • emissions

Vehicle owners ask for tune-ups for a variety of reasons, including improving performance, maintaining reliability, planning a vacation, preparing for winter/summer or because they’re giving the car to a friend or family member.

To help ensure good performance, fuel economy and emissions, we also recommends that motorists take the time necessary to become familiar with their vehicle from every aspect. Study the owner’s manual to become thoroughly acquainted with the operation of all systems. Pay special attention to the indicator lights and instruments.

Getting Your Vehicle Ready For Summer

summer-driving

Summer’s heat, dust, and stop-and-go traffic, will take their toll on your vehicle. Add the effects of last winter, and you could be poised for a breakdown. You can lessen the odds of mechanical failure through periodic maintenance. . . Your vehicle should last longer and command a higher resale price, too!

Some of the following tips are easy to do; others require a skilled auto technician.

  • Air Conditioning – A marginally operating system will fail in hot weather. Have the system examined by a qualified technician. Newer models have cabin air filters that clean the air entering the heating and air conditioning system. Check your owner’s manual for location and replacement interval.
  • Cooling System – The greatest cause of summer breakdowns is overheating. The cooling system should be completely flushed and refilled about every 24 months. The level, condition, and concentration of the coolant should be checked periodically. (A 50/50 mix of anti-freeze and water is usually recommended.) DIYers, Never remove the radiator cap until the engine has thoroughly cooled! The tightness and condition of drive belts, clamps, and hoses should be checked by a pro.
  • Oil – Change your oil and oil filter as specified in your manual-more often (every 3,000 miles) if you make frequent short jaunts, extended trips with lots of luggage, or tow a trailer.
  • Engine Performance – Replace other filters (air, fuel, PCV, etc.) as recommended-more often in dusty conditions. Get engine driveability problems (hard starts, rough idling, stalling, diminished power, etc.) corrected at a good shop.
  • Windshield Wipers – A dirty windshield causes eye fatigue and can pose a safety hazard. Replace worn blades and get plenty of windshield washer solvent.
  • Lights – Inspect all lights and bulbs; replace burned out bulbs; periodically clean dirt and insects from all lenses. To prevent scratching, never use a dry rag.
  • Tires – Have your tires rotated about every 5,000 miles. Check tire pressures once a month; check them while they’re cold before driving for any distance. Don’t forget to check your spare as well and be sure the jack is in good condition. Examine tires for tread life, uneven wearing, and cupping; check the sidewalls for cuts and nicks. An alignment is warranted if there’s uneven tread wear or if your vehicle pulls to one side.
  • Brakes – Brakes should be inspected as recommended in your manual, or sooner if you notice pulsations, grabbing, noises, or longer stopping distance. Minor brake problems should be corrected promptly.
  • Battery – Batteries can fail any time of year. The only accurate way to detect a weak battery is with professional equipment. Routine care: Scrape away corrosion from posts and cable connections; clean all surfaces; re-tighten all connections. If battery caps are removable, check the fluid level monthly. Avoid contact with corrosive deposits and battery acid. Wear eye protection and rubber gloves.
  • Emergencies – Carry some basic tools-ask a technician for suggestions. Also include a first aid kit, flares, and a flashlight. Consider buying a cellular phone.

Getting Your Vehicle Ready for Winter

winter-drivingMechanical failure—an inconvenience anytime it occurs–can be deadly in the winter. Preventive maintenance is a must. Besides, a well-maintained vehicle is more enjoyable to drive, lasts longer, and could command a higher resale price.

Some of the following tips can be performed by any do-it-yourselfer; others require the skilled hands of a professional auto technician.

  • Engine Performance – Get engine driveability problems (hard starts, rough idling, stalling, diminished power, etc.) corrected at a good repair shop. Cold weather makes existing problems worse. Replace dirty filters-air, fuel, etc.
  • Fuel – Put a bottle of fuel de-icer in your tank once a month to help keep moisture from freezing in the fuel line. Note that a full gas tank helps keep moisture from forming.
  • Oil – Change your oil and oil filter as specified in your manual—more often (every 3,000 miles) if your driving is mostly stop-and-go or consists of frequent short trips.
  • Cooling Systems – The cooling system should be completely flushed and refilled about every 24 months. The level, condition, and concentration of the coolant should be checked periodically. (A 50/50 mix of anti-freeze and water is usually recommended.) DIYers, never remove the radiator cap until the engine has thoroughly cooled! The tightness and condition of drive belts, clamps, and hoses should be checked by a pro.
  • Windshield Wipers – Replace old blades. If your climate is harsh, purchase rubber-clad (winter) blades to fight ice build-up. Stock up on windshield washer solvent-you’ll be surprised how much you use. Carry an ice-scraper.
  • Heater/Defroster – The heater and defroster must be in good working condition for passenger comfort and driver visibility. Newer models have a cabin air filter that should be replaced periodically. Check your owner’s manual for the location and replacement interval.
  • Battery – The only accurate way to detect a weak battery is with professional equipment. Routine care: Scrape away corrosion from posts and cable connections; clean all surfaces; re-tighten all connections. If battery caps are removable, check fluid level monthly. Avoid contact with corrosive deposits and battery acid. Wear eye protection and rubber gloves.
  • Lights – Inspect all lights and bulbs; replace burned out bulbs; periodically clean road grime from all lenses. To prevent scratching, never use a dry rag.
  • Exhaust System – Your vehicle should be placed on a lift and the exhaust system examined for leaks. The trunk and floor boards should be inspected for small holes. Exhaust fumes can be deadly.
  • Tires – Worn tires will be of little use in winter weather. Examine tires for remaining tread life, uneven wearing, and cupping; check the sidewalls for cuts and nicks. Check tire pressures once a month. Check the tires when they are cold, before driving for any distance. Rotate as recommended. Don’t forget your spare, and be sure the jack is in good condition.
  • Carry emergency gear: gloves, boots, blankets, flares, a small shovel, sand or kitty litter, tire chains, and a flash light. Put a few “high-energy” snacks in your glove box.